Mayo Clinic (Pheniox Arizona) Clinical Study - TrainingMask

Mayo Clinic (Pheniox Arizona) Clinical Study - TrainingMask

Using A Respiratory Device As A Therapeutic Modality In Patients With A History Of Heart Failure.

JK Parks, J Schwartz, M Shea, BD Johnson, R Fernandes, CM Wheatley-Guy

Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, AZ

Abstract #: P1759

BACKGROUND

  • Study funded by Training Mask Co. (Cadillac, MI)
  • Heart failure (HF) patients are known to have poor exercise tolerance due to both cardiac and pulmonary contributors
  • Limited blood flow reserve
  • Chronotropic incompetence
  • Decreased stroke volume
  • Competition for space in thoracic cavity leading to increased work of breathing and inefficient breathing pattern
  • Exercise increases blood supply demand to muscles
  • Creates competition between respiratory muscles and locomotor muscles
  • HF associated with generalized respiratory muscle weakness
  • Despite increased work and cost of breathing
  • Due primarily to flow resistive work from an altered breathing pattern and increased ventilation (VE)
  • Hypothesis:
  • The use of a respiratory training device during aerobic exercise training would positively impact patients with HF by training the inspiratory muscles and modifying their respiratory response to exercise by improving ventilation and improving ventilation to perfusion matching.

TrainingMask Mayo Clinica Study - Subject Demographics Graph

Methods

  • Recruited patients diagnosed with HF and actively participating in cardiac rehabilitation (CR)
  • Participants randomized to two groups

1.Moderate inspiratory resistance (MR,15 to 20 cmH2O)

2.No respiratory resistance (NR)

  • Respiratory resistance provided by respiratory training mask and only worn during aerobic portions of CR
  • Three separate visits for assessment
  • Baseline, after 8-12 visits to CR and after completion of CR
  • During assessment:
  • Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ)
  • Pulmonary testing
  • Forced vital capacity (FVC), slow vital capacity (SVC), maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV)
  • Maximal effort VO2 test
  • Cardiac output (Q) measurement at rest, 30Watts and anaerobic threshold (AT)
  • Soluble gas method
  • Ventilation (VE)
  • Respiratory gas exchange (RER)

TrainingMask Clinical Study by Mayo Clinic - Method

Results

  • All participants completed on average 23.9 ± 2.5 CR sessions
  • MR group and NR group decreased MLHFQ 19.9±26.9 and 6.0±23.4 (p=0.330), respectively
  • MR group and NR group increased VO2 max by 0.25±1.06 and 1.22±1.30, respectively

No significant difference between groups

Figure 2: Changes from pre to post in (a) Minnesota living with heart failure questionnaire and (b) VO2 max

(a)TrainingMask Mayo Clinic A Graph  (b)training mask clinical data showing mayo clinics b graph

 

Table 2: Peak data per group across time

training mask and mayo click showing clinical data peak data per group across time

Data are presented as mean ± SD

  • At matched workload of 30W:
  • VE declined by 4.0±7.0 L/min in MR and increased by 2.2±13.1 L/min in NR
  • Respiratory rate (RR) decreased in MR and NR by 1.2± 4.9 and 0.67± 5.9 (p>0.05), respectively
  • Heart rate (HR) decreased in MR and NR by 10.4±12.4 and 3.9±8.9 (p=0.036, no difference between groups), respectively
  • Tidal volume (Vt) decreased in MR and NR by -0.01±0.29 and -0.05±0.18, respectively
  • Stroke volume (SV) tended to increase for both groups (p>0.05, no difference between groups)

Figure 3: Changes from pre to post in (a) ventilation, (b) respiratory rate, (c) heart rate, (d) tidal volume, (e) stroke volume and (f) cardiac output

(a)training mask mayo clinic results VE30 Watts  (b)Training Mask RR 30 Watt graph (c)Training Mask Clinical Study by Mayo Clinic HR 30 Watt output

 

(d)

Training Mask Mayo Clinic Study 30 VT 30 Watt output

(e)

Mayo Clinic Training Mask SV 30 Watt Out put

(f)

Training Mask Clinical Data by Mayo Clinic Q 30 Watt Ouput

 

  • MR group had larger gains at submaximal exercise (30W)
  • More efficient at breathing
  • Lower HR
  • Lower Q
  • MR group maintained pre-treatment tidal volume, while NR decreased tidal volume at submaximal exercise (30W)
  • MR group also decreased RR
  • Both groups demonstrated increases in VO2 max 
  • Both groups had no change in resting spirometry (FVC, SVC and MVV)

 2021 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research 

Back to blog
  • Can You Do Altitude Training At Home?

    Can You Do Altitude Training At Home?

    When you start your fitness journey to look fit and healthy or you professionally start your athletic career. In any sports field, you may need to learn more about altitude...

    Can You Do Altitude Training At Home?

    When you start your fitness journey to look fit and healthy or you professionally start your athletic career. In any sports field, you may need to learn more about altitude...

  • How Do You Simulate High-Altitude Training?

    How Do You Simulate High-Altitude Training?

    When you regularly do intense training or you’re a professional athlete with a lot of pressure to maintain. A specific fitness and training routine, you can efficiently maintain a high-altitude...

    How Do You Simulate High-Altitude Training?

    When you regularly do intense training or you’re a professional athlete with a lot of pressure to maintain. A specific fitness and training routine, you can efficiently maintain a high-altitude...

  • How Long Should Elevation Mask Stay On Face?

    How Long Should Elevation Mask Stay On Face?

    Elevation masks have become quite popular among gym lovers and athletes associated with different sports fields. These masks can prove beneficial in enhancing your endurance to intense training and strength-requiring...

    How Long Should Elevation Mask Stay On Face?

    Elevation masks have become quite popular among gym lovers and athletes associated with different sports fields. These masks can prove beneficial in enhancing your endurance to intense training and strength-requiring...

1 of 3
TrainingMask being used by man running up concrete stairs

TRAININGMASK - CLINICAL STUDIES SHOW

Improved Performance Muscle & Strength

Resistance breathing strengthens respiratory muscles, leading to improved lung capacity thresholds and more efficient breathing.

man running down street using Training Mask 3.0 for resistance breathing performance

ATHLETES CAN BENEFIT GREATLY

Enhanced Athletic Performance

By strengthening the respiratory muscles and improving lung capacity, athletes can enhance their oxygen uptake during exercise, leading to improved endurance and performance.

Button label

RELAXATION AND REDUCING STRESS LEVELS

Sleep Quality Improvement

Helps improve sleep quality by promoting relaxation and reducing stress levels that create conducive environment for restful sleep by strengthening the respiratory muscles and improving airflow during sleep.

INCREASED FEELINGS OF CALM AND WELL-BEING

Calmly Focused

Resistance Breathing devices like Training Mask can help activate the parasympathetic nervous system. This technique involves inhaling through the nose and exhaling slowly through exhale valves that create resistance to the airflow. By slowing down and extending the exhalation, resistance breathing stimulates the vagus nerve, leading to a relaxation response, reduced heart rate, and increased feelings of calm and well-being.

Enhanced Endurance | Improved Stamina | Increased Mental Focus | Accelerated Results

Revolutionize your training and take your fitness to the next level with TrainingMask. Our cutting-edge training equipment is designed to enhance your performance, improve endurance, and optimize your workouts. Whether you're a professional athlete, fitness enthusiast, or someone looking to improve their overall health, TrainingMask has the tools you need to reach your goals.